Division of Recreation and Parks

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Lower Wekiva River - Canoe Kayak Launch

Activity Type: 

Description: 

Canoe and kayak launching is available at Katie’s Landing located on Wekiva Park Drive off of SR 46 in Sorrento.  This is the only launch area in the preserve and places you on the Wekiva River – a national designated Wild & Scenic River (link is external).

The distances provided here can be used to help plan your trip. These are approximated distances; for GPS coordinates of the various points please see the Paddle Wekiva Brochure (link is external) on the Wekiva Wild & Scenic website.  To approximate travel time most canoe forums say a canoe with 2 people and 25 lbs. of equipment can average 3 mph/4.8 kph on still water.  Traveling north with the current will be faster than traveling south against it.  A kayak will be slightly faster as well.

DISTANCES BETWEEN POINTS OF INTEREST

Katie’s Landing north to Blackwater Creek (Wekiva River) – 4 mile/6.4 km

Katie’s Landing north to Highbanks Boat Ramp (Wekiva River) – 7.6 miles/12.2 km

Katie’s Landing south to Wilson’s Landing Park (Wekiva River) – 1.5 miles/ 2.4 km

Katie’s Landing south to Buffalo Tram (Wekiva River) – 6.5 miles/ 10.5 km

Katie’s Landing south to Wekiva Island (Wekiva River) – 9.0 miles/ 14.5 km

Katie’s Landing to Wekiwa Springs (Wekiva River) – 10 miles/16.0 km

Katie’s Landing to King’s Landing/Kelly Park (Rock Springs Run) – 17.5 miles/28.2 km

Bulow Creek - Hiking Nature Trail

Activity Type: 

Description: 

There are several trails for exploring the interior of the park. Two trails start from the parking area at the Fairchild Oak. The Wahlin Trail is a short loop around a groundwater spring that seeps from a "coquina" rock bluff. Boardwalks that carry you over the sensitive ecosystem of the seepage slope provide beautiful views of this extremely unique environment.

The Bulow Woods Trail is a 6.8 mile hiking trail that runs from the Fairchild Oak to Bulow Plantation Ruins State Historic Site. From the parking area at Bulow Creek, the trail will take you through the old growth live oak hammock, following freshwater seepage slopes which are a great visual of our Florida Aquifer in action. A small bridge at 1.5 miles provides a scenic view of Cedar Creek. The trail is 6.8 miles one-way, totaling over 13 miles to return to Bulow Creek. White-tailed deer, barred owls and raccoons are commonly seen and, occasionally, a diamondback rattlesnake. Mosquitoes can be a nuisance seasonally, and a water bottle is highly recommended as there is no potable water available except at Bulow Plantation. The hiking trail is open for day use from 8:30 am to sunset. Maps and information are available at either trailhead or at Tomoka State Park, 4.5 miles south on Old Dixie Highway.

Bulow Creek - Canoeing and Kayaking

Activity Type: 

Description: 

Access to Bulow Creek and its surrounding tributaries is attainable through a parking area off Walter Boardman Lane, High Bridge Road, and other areas along Old Dixie Highway. There is a proper boat ramp located at Bulow Plantation Historic State Park which allows you to launch onto Bulow Creek. At the Fairchild Oak park entrance there is no water access and no rentals.

Florida Keys - Boat Ramp

Activity Type: 

Description: 

The turquoise waters surrounding the Florida Keys Overseas Heritage Trail invite trail users to enjoy boating activities. Boat ramps are available at several of the state parks in the Keys, with some offering marina facilities. There are also ramps managed by the FKOHT at other locations, as marked on the trail map. The John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park has a very good deepwater boat ramp, located at the marina. This ramp can handle most boats up to 36 feet in length.

Lower Wekiva River - Bicycling

Activity Type: 

Description: 

Cyclists of all levels can find a challenging and enjoyable ride in the Preserve. Bicycling is permitted on the Nature Trail located at the Southern entrance of the preserve (trail is approximately 2.5 miles). The 18 miles of trails located at the Northern entrance of the preserve are multi-use trails and bicyclists are welcome. Because the trails are multi-use, be prepared to meet the occasional hiker, horseback rider, or park vehicle. Please stay on designated trails, ride responsibly, and respect the park and wildlife. The park closes at sundown and you must exit the park at that time, so please plan your ride accordingly.

Helmets are highly recommended for all cyclists and Florida law requires helmets for cyclists age 16 and under.

The trails are located in a wilderness area.
Please take water, a compass and a map when utilizing them.

Bulow Creek - Bicycling

Activity Type: 

Description: 

The 6.8 mile Bulow Woods trail is known for the stately oaks and hardwood trees that line the trail. Mountain bikes are a great way to experience this trail. While the trail is generally dry, the wet season can create some shallow standing water and muddy sections. Obstacles along the trail may include; protruding roots, uneven surfaces and low water crossings.  Helmets are highly recommended for all cyclists and Florida law requires helmets for cyclists age 16 and under.

Florida Keys - Birding

Activity Type: 

Description: 

As it follows the path of an important migration route, the Florida Keys Overseas Heritage Trail offers great opportunities to observe a rich variety of birds, including many types of wading birds and shorebirds. The Great Florida Birding and Wildlife Trail offers a self-guided experience in learning about the species that may be found in this area. To help protect birds and marine life from the hazards of becoming entangled in discarded fishing line, there are recycling bins placed at the ends of the Trail's fishing bridges and Trail volunteers frequently assist with the monofilament recycling program.

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