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The dock located in the picnic pavilion area is a fishing hot spot, but some like to just relax and take in the picturesque setting of Pellicer Creek. Many park visitors find the two large covered picnic pavilions the perfect spot for lunch while the kids play on the nearby playground. There are 30 campsites equipped with water and electric, and an abundance of wildlife call the park home. New to Faver-Dykes are Jordan and Mellon Islands.  Both are located along the Matanzas River and offer picnic areas, primitive campsites and trails.
Faver-Dykes State Park
Pellicer Creek is a designated canoe trail and is also a popular site for fishing and birding.

History and Culture

Pellicer Creek was named for settler Francisco Pellicer built his homestead along the banks of the creek around 1800 after receiving a land grant from the King of Spain. The park was originally part of the Buena Suerte Plantation granted in 1817 by Spain to General Joseph Hernandez. During the Second Seminole War the area was occupied by U.S. troops and in 1950, Hiram Faver, a former longtime Clerk of the Court in St. Johns County donated the land to the Florida State Board of Parks and Historic Memorials. The park is named for his parents, Alexander Hall Faver and Florida Dykes Faver. Rich long leaf pines, cooling hammocks and spreading marshes engulf the park. Wildflowers and ferns thrive under the canopy which provides habitat for the area's wild turkeys and other native wildlife.

This 16th-century Theodor de Bry engraving of Florida's native people gives some idea of how they looked and lived.

The Lost Tribe

Faver-Dyke's Lost Tribe: The Timucuan Indians, Faver-Dykes' first inhabitants, arrived around 500 B.C. They lived in villages close to Pellicer Creek, which today makes up the southern border of the park. Their homes were protected from hurricanes by the barrier island lying east of the park across the Matanzas River. They lived at Faver-Dykes for hundreds of years and were skilled hunters and fishermen. The forest, river and ocean played an important role in their everyday lives.

In 1967, this memorial plaque and wall were dedicated to Hiram Faver.

Dedication

Hiram Faver looks at the monument constructed in his honor and in memory of his parents, Alexander Hall Faver and Florida Dykes Faver, at a ceremony held at the park in November 1967. Faver-Dykes became the 63rd park in the Florida Park System and according to then Florida Senate President Verle A. Pope, the park was a needed asset to the system. The park did not waste time making itself ready for visitors. According to an article printed in the St. Augustine Record, State Park Director Bill Miller announced during his speech that the state had appropriated funds to begin building a campground at the park.

This monument was dedicated to Hiram Faver in 1967, when he donated the land that is now Faver-Dykes State Park.

Hiram Faver Monument

Faver-Dykes State Park was originally part of the Buena Suerte Plantation granted in 1817 by Spain to General Joseph Hernandez. During the Second Seminole War the area was occupied by U.S. troops. In 1950, Hiram Faver, a former long time Clerk of the Court in St. Johns County, donated the land to the Florida State Board of Parks and Historic Memorials. The park is named for his parents, Alexander Hall Faver and Florida Dykes Faver. The monument that was dedicated to Hiram in 1967 still stands and is a constant reminder of his generosity.

This sketch of Hiram Faver is hanging in the ranger station at Faver-Dykes State Park.

Hiram Faver

Hiram Faver's generosity continues to contribute to the park. His estate has funded the addition of a new nature trail, currently under construction. The trail will be at least two miles long and feature informational kiosks and signs along the way.

A map dated 1864 shows the land divided between Pellicer Plantation, the Carter Plantation and Hemmings Point.

Early Map

A map dated 1864 shows the land divided between Pellicer Plantation, the Carter Plantation and Hemmings Point. Although Hiram Faver later donated about 752 acres to the state of Florida, the park now consists of 6,045 acres. When completed, the new Hiram Faver Trail will lead to Hemmings Point and allow visitors to see an area of the park that is rarely visited.