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Remains of three of the large cooking kettles lie on one side of the mill chimney. These large rollers crushed the cane in the early stages of sugar production. This covered picnic pavilion offers visitors a chance to relax across the street from the ruins. These picnic tables and the restroom facilities just beyond are located under shady trees.
Yulee Sugar Mill Ruins Historic State Park
The sugar mill ruins are seen here, shaded by moss-draped trees.

History and Culture

David Levy Yulee was a member of Florida's first constitutional convention in 1838-39; and in 1841, was elected as a territorial delegate to the Congress. When Florida became a state in 1845, he was chosen as its first U.S. Senator. By 1851, Yulee's sugar mill had more than 150 slaves and used expensive machinery imported from New York. For 10 years, it was a time of peace and prosperity. When the Civil War began in 1861, the mill served as a supplier of sugar products for Southern troops, and his mansion became a supply stockpile. In May 1864, a Union naval force burned his home. The mill escaped harm, but never reopened.

This photograph shows the sugar mill ruins as they appeared in the late 1940s or early 1950s.

Mill circa 1946-55

The Yulee Sugar Mill was originally owned by Senator David Levy Yulee and was the original mill works for his 'Marguerita' plantation in the period just prior to the Civil War. The mill and plantation remained in operation until 1864 when the plantation house was burned by Federal troops. This photograph, taken in the late 1940s or early 1950s, shows the condition of the mill ruins at that time and the abundant vegetation which surrounded them.

This photograph, taken circa 1946-1955, shows remains of the mill's rolling press scattered on the ground.

Rolling press parts

This photograph, taken in the early 1940s or early 1950s, shows elements of the rolling press scattered on the ground. The rolling press was originally used to extract juice from sugar cane.

This photograph, taken in 2007, shows the reconstructed rolling press.

Rolling Press

This photograph, taken in 2007, shows the rolling press much as it appears today. A partial reconstruction of the roller press assembly in the mid-1960s and subsequent stabilization of the mill ruins in 2006 helped to provide a more complete interpretation of the mill site.

This 2006 photograph shows two workers repointing brick on the mill's chimney stack.

Mill Stabilization

Stabilization of the sugar mill ruins took place in 2006. This project was undertaken by staff and volunteers of the Florida Park Service in cooperation with the National Park Service. Here two workers are repointing the brick of the mill's chimney stack.

This 2007 photograph shows the sugar mill ruins much as they appear today.

Mill 2007

This photograph, taken in 2007, shows the Yulee Sugar Mill Ruins much as they appear today. Stabilization of the mill ruins and removal of the vegetation immediately surrounding them has greatly improved the site's appearance as well as help assure the preservation of the ruins.