Florida State Parks 75th Anniversary Logo
A fiddler crab sits near his hole in the grass and sand. (Photo by Matt Paulson) An American bald eagle scans the horizon. (Photo by Bill Combs) A gopher tortoise eats grass. (Photo by John Eldrith) An endangered Florida scrub jay that has been banded for tracking by biologists.
Cedar Key Scrub State Reserve
The sun sets over the water, silhouetted through the dark branches of trees.

History and Culture

Cedar Key Scrub State Reserve consists of more than 5,000 acres of scrub, dominated by live oak, myrtle oak, Chapman's oak, rusty lyonia and saw palmetto. The Reserve is home to the Florida scrub jay, southern bald eagle and other various birds. This land became a state reserve in 1978.

Waterways at the Reserve are popular places for canoeists and kayakers to paddle. (Photo by Colleen Braun)

Waterways at the Reserve

The shallow waters and numerous creeks near the salt marsh provide excellent opportunities for canoeing and kayaking. There is no launch within the reserve. Rental canoes and kayaks are available in nearby Cedar Key. Anglers enjoy saltwater fishing.

A Florida scrub jay with an acorn in its beak. (Photo by Roxanne Evans)

Florida Scrub Jay

The diverse habitats of the reserve provide opportunities for nature study and wildlife observation. The reserve is home to the Florida scrub jay, southern bald eagle and other various birds.

Park staff conduct a prescribed burn.

Prescribed Fire

Prescribed fire is an essential resource management tool used by land managers to meet specific objectives. Florida has been shaped by fire for thousands of years and the use of prescribed fire is beneficial for the ecosystems that depend on fire for their survival. Low intensity prescribed fire reduces the buildup of forest fuels that can promote violent wildfires.

Picnic tables and grills with a covered pavilion at the picnic area.

Picnic Area

Bring a picnic lunch and enjoy the great outdoors. A small picnic area is located at the trail head on the eastern portion of the reserve. A picnic shelter, picnic tables, grills and informational kiosk are also located in this area. The trailhead has a stabilized parking area to accommodate about 15 vehicles.

A trail winds through the scrub at Cedar Key Scrub Reserve.

Trail through the Scrub

Hikers, bicyclists and equestrians enjoy the reserve's four miles of trails on the east portion of the park and eight miles of trails on the western portion. The reserve is divided into two portions by County Road 347 which runs between Cedar Key and Fowlers Bluff. The diverse habitats of the reserve provide opportunities for nature study and wildlife observation.