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A ranger and visitor pause on one of the 236 steps leading down into the 120-feet deep sinkhole. This half-mile nature trail runs along the top of the Devil's Millhopper. White-tail deer are sometimes spotted. (Photo by John Roy) Butterflies enjoy the lush tropical setting. (Photo by Tom Zurflieh)
Devils Millhopper Geological State Park
Looking up from the bottom of the Millhopper gives visitors a sense of the size of this sinkhole, formed thousands of years ago.

History and Culture

Devil's Millhopper is a National Natural Landmark that has been visited by the curious since the early 1880s. Researchers have learned a great deal about Florida's natural history by studying fossil shark teeth, marine shells and the fossilized remains of extinct land animals found in the sink. The sinkhole is 120 feet deep and 500 feet across. A one-half mile nature trail follows the rim, and there is a 236-step stairway to the bottom of the sink. The state purchased this site in 1974, and the stairs were completed in 1976. Until that time, access in the area was limited.

The Legend of the Devil's Millhopper (PDF - 0.22KB)

Hawks are one of the many species of bird that may be seen at the park.

Hawks on a Fence

The diverse habitat of the area is attractive to hawks.

A squirrel grasps an acorn.

Squirrel

Squirrels, tree frogs, birds and other small animals can be seen along the slopes of the sinkhole and along the nature trail. Occasionally white-tailed deer and wild turkey can be spotted. (Photo by T. Anderson)

The park's Visitor Center offers visitors interpretive exhibits and an audio-visual program.

Visitor Center

A Visitor Center offers interpretive displays and exhibits that explain the site's natural history. Park rangers offer guided walks on Saturdays at 10:00 a.m.

A trail leads along a fence to the sinkhole.

Trail

Take a half-mile trail around the rim of the sinkhole and travel down the 220 steps to the bottom. Explore 63 acres of nature to search for wildlife.

Fed by the many small streams that trickle in and out of the limestone, lush green vegetation lines the sides of the Devil's Millhopper sinkhole.

Boardwalk

Devil's Millhopper is a National Natural Landmark that has been visited by the curious since the early 1880s. Researchers have learned a great deal about Florida's natural history by studying fossil shark teeth, marine shells and the fossilized remains of extinct land animals found in the sink. The sinkhole is 120 feet deep and 500 feet across. A one-half mile nature trail follows the rim.  A boardwalk and 236 steps descend to the bottoom of the sinkhole.  The state purchased this site in 1974, and the stairs were completed in 1976. Until that time, access in the area was limited.