Florida State Parks 75th Anniversary Logo
Visitors enjoy the Gulf while relaxing on a white sandy beach that slopes upward, becoming sand dunes covered with sea oats. Boardwalks through maritime hammock lead to the beach and picnic areas. Visitors head down the path to the sunny beach where they can enjoy fishing, boating, picnicking, beachcombing and other seaside activities. The great egret, shown here enjoying the bay side of the park, is one of many bird species found at Delnor-Wiggins Pass.
Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Park
The colorful sunset, captured here, is just one of the breathtaking views experienced at Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Park.

History and Culture

The written record of this area begins in the late 1800s with Joe Wiggins, the namesake of the pass. Wiggins, the first homesteader, ran an apiary and trading post where he traded goods with Seminole Indians and settlers. Decades later, Collier County acquired the land through the philanthropic generosity of Lester J. and Dellora A. Norris¿hence the name 'Delnor.' In 1970, the state of Florida purchased the land from Collier County for a state park, which opened in 1976.

This aerial view of Wiggins Pass was taken in the 1960s.

Wiggins Pass

Long before today's visitors, Calusa Indians thrived on this coast by harvesting the rich bounty of the Gulf and bay waters. The Calusa built villages, raised large mounds and dug canals for their boats.

The boardwalk in this historic image became the entrance to the undeveloped barrier island known today as Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Park.

Pedestrian Boardwalk

The written record of this area begins in the late 1800s with Joe Wiggins, the namesake of the pass. Wiggins, the first homesteader, ran an apiary and trading post used by the Seminole Indians and settlers.

The park sign in this historic photo shows the name of the park, derived from the names of Joe Wiggins and land owner Dellora A. Norris.

Entrance Sign

Collier County acquired the park land through the philanthropic generosity of Lester J. and Dellora A. Norris. In 1970, the state of Florida purchased the land from Collier County. Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Park opened in 1976.

The short boardwalk in this historic image crossed coastal hammock and sand dunes leading out to the beach.

Boardwalk

Boardwalks take visitors over the coastal hammocks where native vegetation was displaced by invasive species such as the Australian pine. These invasive species are being phased out and replanted with native trees and plants of the original maritime hammock.

The cars in this historic photo enjoyed the same easy parking access to the beach that visitors do today.

Visitor Parking

Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Park has gracefully matured since it opened in 1976. It is a good example of ongoing exotic removal and the restoration of Florida's coastal plant communities. Whether birding, beachcombing or boating, the park holds interests for people of all ages and recreational preferences.